WORD OF THE DAY

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acorn

Two main shapes were adopted for the apex - the acorn and the hogsback.

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Monoecious, and bearing their male flowers in catkins, they are readily distinguished from the rest of the catkin-bearing trees by their peculiar fruit, an acorn or nut, enclosed at the base in a woody cup, formed by the consolidation of numerous involucral bracts developed beneath the fertile flower, simultaneously with a cup-like expansion of the thalamus, to which the bracteal scales are more or less adherent.

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THYROSTRACA, an order of Crustacea, comprising barnacles, acorn shells and some allied degenerate parasites.

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The valonia of commerce, one of the richest of tanning materials, is the acorn of Q.

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The growth of the oak is slow, though it varies greatly in different trees; Loudon states that an oak, raised from the acorn in a garden at Sheffield Place, Sussex, became in seventy years 12 ft.

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The earlier English spoon-handles terminate in an acorn, plain knob or a diamond; at the end of the 16th century the baluster and seal ending becomes common, the bowl being "fig-shaped."

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In 1856 he commissioned the "Acorn" brig for the China station, and arrived in time to take part in the destruction of the junks in Fatshan creek on the 1st of June 1857, and in the capture of Canton in the following December, for which, in February 1858, he received a post-captain's commission.

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- The " Acorn Club " has recently published a list of books printed in Connecticut between 1709 and 1800 (Hartford, 1904), and Alexander Johnston's Connecticut (Boston, 1887) contains a bibliography of Connecticut's history up to 1886.

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A bitter principle to which the name of quercin has been applied by Gerber, its discoverer, has also been detected in the acorn of the common oak; the nutritive portion seems chiefly a form of starch.

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A tree close to the house still bears the name of Charles's oak, but tradition goes no further than to assert that it grew from an acorn of the original tree.

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Valonia, a material largely used by tanners, is the pericarp of an acorn obtained in the neighbouring oakwoods, and derives its name from Valona.

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The moss-like covering of the "bedeguars" of the wild rose, the galls of a Cynipid, Rhodites rosae, represents leaves which have been developed with scarcely any parenchyma between their fibro-vascular bundles; and the " artichoke-galls " or " oak-strobile," produced by Aphilothrix L., which insect arrests the development of the acorn, consists of a cupule to which more or less modified leaf-scales are attached, with a peduncular, oviform, inner ga11.4 E.

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If we plant an acorn in the ground, an oak tree will grow.

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The vernacular name barnacle, traceable to the fable of pedunculate cirripedes hatching out into bernicle geese, has also been transferred to the sessile cirripedes, which are popularly known as acorn barnacles.

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A tiny acorn of an idea grew rapidly into a massive oak.

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Publishers ' Seminar On June 11th ACORN is holding a seminar for participating publishers ' Seminar On June 11th ACORN is holding a seminar for participating publishers and other invitees in London.

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Its dishes are known to be experimental, like the acorn soup with duck liver and sage or its corzetti with pigs trotter.

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I've added links to 2 of my other acorn orientated pages, take a look, they're well worth a visit!

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Carrying a dried acorn is believed to bring good luck, ward off illness and ensure a long life.

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You can use this crust recipe for any type of filling such as Swiss chard and red onions, acorn squash and apples, or sautéed tomatoes, mozzarella cheese and eggs.

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