WORD OF THE DAY

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absurd

It had an absurd ritual and a strange uniform.

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I'm curious, and it's absurd I'm not allowed to talk to anyone!

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He is a most absent-minded and absurd fellow, but he has a heart of gold.

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The idea was absurd, even for someone as chauvinistic as Romas.

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Leaning back against the counter, she laughed out loud at her absurd thought.

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For absurd and impracticable schemes in Italy and elsewhere he neglected Germany, and sought to involve its princes in wars undertaken solely for private aggrandizement or personal jealousy.

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Oh, how absurd you are!

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The source of this equally absurd and infamous libel has never been discovered.

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Nearly every mail brings some absurd statement, printed or written.

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How perfectly absurd to say that Helen is 'already talking fluently!'

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"What an absurd creature!" he exclaimed.

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But it would be absurd to suppose that we could reach those conclusions by simple reference to the trades themselves.

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A perfectly absurd and stupid fellow, and a gambler too, I am told.

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The same may be said of the many, often absurd, accusations subsequently brought against him by jealous rivals or ignorant contemporaries who hated Godunov's reforms as novelties.

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After Palmerston's enforced resignation, there was a new and more absurd hubbub.

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To this we may add a fantastic and absurd allegorization, the indiscriminate laudation of saints and martyrs, polemical strife, the hardening of the doctrine into dogma, the development of a narrow ecclesiasticism, and the failure of the missionary spirit in the orthodox section of the Eastern Church (as contrasted with the marvellous evangelistic activity of the Nestorians.

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And though Spencer's general position - that it is absurd to suppose that organisms after being modified by their life should give birth to offspring showing no traces of such modifications - seems the more philosophic, yet it does not dispose of the facts which go to show that most of the evidence for the direct transmission of adaptations is illusory, and that beings are organised to minimize the effects of life on the reproductive tissues, so that the transmission of the effects of use and disuse, if it occurs, must be both difficult and rare - far more so than is convenient for Spencer's psychology.

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A note by Cyril Lucar states that it was written by Thecla, a noble lady of Egypt, but this is probably merely his interpretation of an Arabic note of the 14th century which states that the MS. was written by Thecla, the martyr, an obviously absurd legend; another Arabic note by Athanasius (probably Athanasius III., patriarch c. 1308) states that it was given to the patriarchate of Alexandria, and a Latin note of a later period dates the presenta tion in 1098.

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The whole field of labour and contracts was covered by minute regulations, which, good in theory, were absurd in practice, and which failed altogether, but not until labour had been disorganized for several years.

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The whole field of labour and contracts was covered by minute regulations, which, good in theory, were absurd in practice, and which failed altogether, but not until labour had been disorganized for several years.

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